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Malcolm Reynolds
22nd Jan 2008, 09:48 PM
Hey everyone! I was fooling around with light settings and I came up with this image. Finally figured out how to get the lighting I like :p This is my connie but with Prologic's textures.

gpdesigner
22nd Jan 2008, 10:52 PM
the lighting looks good on that Malcolm, but shouldn't that surface be a bit more metalic . .
gp

Zippy
23rd Jan 2008, 11:06 AM
As well the funky rounded section of the drydock is intended to be used as a different drydock. I built it to be tileable lengthwise. Essentially two types in one, old style and new style.

Kionel
23rd Jan 2008, 11:09 AM
Is that what it's intended to be?

I almost animated that in the Phase II animation as a sliding, additional light rig for dock workers to focus on a certain section of the hull at a time. Still kinda like the idea of that functionality, to be honest. ;)

Tony

Crome
23rd Jan 2008, 11:16 AM
the lighting looks good on that Malcolm, but shouldn't that surface be a bit more metalic . .
gp
On the enterprise? If thats what you meant then yes it probably should but it was a mistake they made when making the model in the original series and the surface of Trek ships did stay looking this way through the first few movies, guess it could just be the paintjob they did on them?

Kionel
23rd Jan 2008, 11:42 AM
As well the funky rounded section of the drydock is intended to be used as a different drydock. I built it to be tileable lengthwise. Essentially two types in one, old style and new style.

...oh, and thank you for your mesh! I freaking love it, and have abused the heck out of it recently.

Including, I'm embarrased to say, forgetting to credit you for your drydock in the Phase II video. D'oh!

I'll have to re-cut that with updated credits...

Tony

nova1701dms
23rd Jan 2008, 02:06 PM
Super!

Crook
23rd Jan 2008, 04:50 PM
Why is it that docks make any starship look instantly great? I'm going to have to render my ent in a dock to see what I get.

Kionel
23rd Jan 2008, 05:32 PM
Why is it that docks make any starship look instantly great? I'm going to have to render my ent in a dock to see what I get.

My guess? It provides another sense of scale, and gives the image of the ship instant context.

My only crits for the piece are:


To match the more subtle surfacing of the starship, "soften" the textures on Zippy's drydock to be less striking.
Add at least one workbee moving (including motion blur) through across the dock.
If possible, a few dockworkers for scale.
In short, add more to the actual activity of the scene.

Tony

Zippy
24th Jan 2008, 12:23 AM
Indeed. In all honesty I'm surprised to see it still being used as it's 6 years old already lol. Maybe I'll make a new one (with a moving utility section ;)). Time to pull out TMP Special Edition DVD :D.

Gunner68
24th Jan 2008, 12:40 AM
Always great to see the Big E---great work!

Gunner

Malcolm Reynolds
26th Jan 2008, 04:38 PM
Thank you everyone!

gpdesigner: Actually I have to say I agree with crome. After seeing the enterprise in Washington DC, I have to say it does not look very metallic.

Zippy: I never knew that, but to be honest, I like both of them there. I'm not sure quite why but I do.

Sorry for the late update but my internet connection on my PC has been down recently but here are some new pictures. I lowered the spec and diffuse on the drydock slightly.
Also, experimented with prologic's D7 and came up with this picture.:)

gpdesigner
26th Jan 2008, 04:54 PM
No doubt . . . I am sure they had to compensate for the effects of film on the paint job, I was just thinking that of course "in theory" The ship would have been made out of some kind of metal composite . . who knows I could be wrong . . wouldn't be the first time today . . D' oh! . . .
gp

Rigel
26th Jan 2008, 08:10 PM
No doubt . . . I am sure they had to compensate for the effects of film on the paint job, I was just thinking that of course "in theory" The ship would have been made out of some kind of metal composite . . who knows I could be wrong . . wouldn't be the first time today . . D' oh! . . .
gp

Actually, you are right on all counts. The show made reference to the hull being made of tri-titanium, the strongest material ever created. Also, the model tended to be a nightmare to photograph, partly because of the round curves in the design and mostly because it was painted in a concrete colour; concrete is very good at picking up the colours of the environment around it apparently. It was a struggle to keep the Enterprise from coming out as a blob on film. The effect of the paint colour also accounts for ship appearing to be white, silver, blueish and even green in some shots. The aztec pattern on the movie model was created in an attempt to improve the ship's photogenicness.

Kionel
26th Jan 2008, 08:48 PM
Also, the model tended to be a nightmare to photograph, partly because of the round curves in the design and mostly because it was painted in a concrete colour; concrete is very good at picking up the colours of the environment around it apparently. It was a struggle to keep the Enterprise from coming out as a blob on film. The effect of the paint colour also accounts for ship appearing to be white, silver, blueish and even green in some shots. The aztec pattern on the movie model was created in an attempt to improve the ship's photogenicness.

Yow.

Of course, the stories about how the refit model was both beautiful beyond words under lights during photography for TMP also leads to the fact that the paint job made the model practically unuseable. One of the reasons the model was photographed so darkly was that any more light would scatter the image everywhere.

ILM solved this problem in II by matte-coating the hull. Made the model more useable, but also killed some of its unique look.

Shame, really.

Tony

CrippledPidgeon
28th Jan 2008, 01:54 AM
Yow.

Of course, the stories about how the refit model was both beautiful beyond words under lights during photography for TMP also leads to the fact that the paint job made the model practically unuseable. One of the reasons the model was photographed so darkly was that any more light would scatter the image everywhere.

ILM solved this problem in II by matte-coating the hull. Made the model more useable, but also killed some of its unique look.

Shame, really.

Tony

And I'm not sure about this, the old enterprise relied on white backgrounds to create mattes? I'm not entirely sure what the process was, but based on photos of the effects stage (and inferences from Mary Poppins - approximately contemporary), it kinda looks like that's what they did. Because the original Enterprise was painted with flat colors, it can show broad areas of white rather than the hotspots of gloss paint. In a couple effects shots, the matte got extended into the ship itself, and you can see stars.


The refit Enterprise in TMP was actually shot dark because the vision for the effects was that there are not many major light sources that the Enterprise would pass by, so hence all the self-illumination. The varying degrees of gloss paint would accentuate the lights on the ship, but in changing how the effects were produced (I don't know how --> blue screen) they found that the gloss paints easily reflected the blue screen and ruined mattes.